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Prostate Cancer Panel logo

Is the Invitae Prostate Panel the right test for you?

If several members of your family have had prostate and other cancers – or maybe you have had a diagnosis yourself, this test is all about early detection, prevention and tailored therapies.

It involves analysis of up to 17 genes chosen to provide more precise data to guide you about additional screening or treatments and/or eligibility for clinical trials.

To get this test you will first need a consultation with your clinician where you can ask if this is the most appropriate option for you, then you can either:

  • Buy it directly from this website (this cost may be covered by your medical insurance).
  • Access it through your treating hospital/private healthcare provider.

This test is only available to those aged 18 years or above.

Our price £595 (RRP £995) Save £400

Why?Close tab

Would more frequent screening help you?

This test can help your clinician decide at what age and how often you should have screening for prostate and other cancers

Lifestyle choices which could reduce your risk

There’s no proven prostate cancer prevention strategy, but you may reduce your risk of prostate cancer by making healthy choices, such as exercising and eating a healthy diet that is low in fat.

Possible treatment choices

Identifying which specific therapies could help you is another aspect of this test, which can identify if you may benefit from a new therapy called PARP inhibitor treatment.

It involves drugs which block an enzyme used by cancer cells to repair damage caused by chemotherapy to their DNA, but it doesn’t affect healthy cells. In effect, it causes tumour cells to die.

This test analyses 17 genes including BRCA1 and BRCA2 – if no mutations are found in these, this gives you and your clinician a clear indication that targeted PARP inhibitor treatment will help you.

Your family

This test can also indicate if other member of your family may have hereditary risk of developing prostate or other cancers – and therefore what steps they need to take for further screening or monitoring.

You can discuss this with your clinician, or if you would like to talk to one of our experts about the test, call us on +44 (0) 7495 981816

How?Close tab

What do I need to do?

This test is an analysis of your blood, so your Clinician will need to take a blood sample from you.

ProcessClose tab

Buying the test

Step 1: There are two options:

  • Via your treating hospital/private healthcare provider (we have special arrangements with many healthcare providers to enable you to access this test, click here to see the list)
  • By clicking the ‘Buy direct now’ button above (the cost may be covered by your medical insurance – check your policy details)

Step 2: Collection of sample

We will liaise directly with your clinician and organise the collection of your sample and delivery to the laboratory.

Step 3: Analysis and reporting

Your sample will be analysed and a report will be generated, usually within 10–21 calendar days (14 days on average) of receipt of your sample in the laboratory.

Step 4: Results

Your clinician will receive the test report giving a clear indication of whether you are at risk of prostate cancer or if you have already been diagnosed, what steps you – and possibly other members of your family – need to take next.

ResultsClose tab

What your results mean for you

Your clinician will be able to discuss your results and their implications for you, but as a guide:

Positive

A positive result does NOT mean you have cancer, or that you will definitely develop it.

It does means that a mutation, or genetic change, has been identified in a specific gene that increases the chance of your developing certain cancers in your lifetime – and your personal results will provide more detailed information specific to you. Talk to your clinician about creating a screening and management plan for you, and to identify relatives who may also need to be tested.

Negative

A negative result means that no mutations or genetic changes associated with an increased risk of the most common hereditary cancers were identified in the genes that were analysed. The result does not eliminate your risk of developing cancer completely as there are other factors, such as lifestyle, or perhaps mutations not detected by current technology or mutations in other genes. Again, talk to your clinician about what the results mean for you.

Variant of uncertain significance

This is where a gene mutation has been found, but at present we do not know if this affects your risk of certain cancers. In this case, your clinician will be able to talk about screening recommendations based on your personal and family medical histories and if new information becomes available, Invitae will update your clinician.

 

CliniciansClose tab

Is Invitae Prostate Panel the right test for your patient?

This panel may be considered for individuals with prostate cancer. Other candidates for testing include those whose history is suggestive of a hereditary cancer syndrome, such as a personal and/or family history of:

  • prostate, breast, ovarian, uterine, colon, pancreatic, melanoma, or sarcoma, particularly if early onset (<50)
  • prostate cancer with a Gleason score ≥7
  • metastatic or high to very high risk localized prostate cancer
  • male breast cancer
  • breast or ovarian cancer and Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry

There are also some common, general features suggestive of a hereditary cancer syndrome family. These include:

  • cancer diagnosed at an unusually young age
  • different types of cancer that have occurred independently in the same person
  • cancer that has developed in both organs of a set of paired organs (e.g., both kidneys; both breasts)
  • several close blood relatives that have the same type of cancer
  • unusual cases of a specific cancer type (e.g., breast cancer in a man)

Test description

This test analyses up to 17 genes associated with a hereditary predisposition to prostate cancer. These genes were selected based on available evidence to provide Invitae’s most comprehensive test targeting hereditary prostate cancer.

Genetic testing may confirm a clinical diagnosis and guide treatment and management decisions. At-risk relatives may also be identified, allowing pursuit of a diagnostic evaluation, early detection and improved clinical outcome. This test is specifically designed for heritable germline mutations and is not appropriate for the detection of somatic mutations in tumour tissue.

Primary panel (12 genes)

ATM BRCA1 BRCA2 CHEK2 EPCAM HOXB13 MLH1 MSH2 MSH6 NBN PMS2 TP53

Add-on Preliminary-evidence Genes for Prostate Cancer (5 genes)

In addition to the primary panel, clinicians can also choose to include genes that have limited evidence of association with hereditary prostate cancer. At this time, the association of these genes with hereditary prostate cancer remains uncertain; however, some clinicians may wish to include genes that may prove to be clinically significant in the future. These genes can be added at no additional charge.

BRIP1 FANCA PALB2 RAD51C RAD51D

ValidationClose tab

References

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  2. Liede, A, et al. Cancer risks for male carriers of germline mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2: a review of the literature. J. Clin. Oncol. 2004; 22(4):735-42. PMID: 14966099
  3. Cybulski, C, et al. NBS1 is a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. Cancer Res. 2004; 64(4):1215-9. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.can-03-2502. PMID: 14973119
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  9. Cybulski, C, et al. An inherited NBN mutation is associated with poor prognosis prostate cancer. Br. J. Cancer. 2013; 108(2):461-8. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2012.486. PMID: 23149842
  10. MacInnis, RJ, et al. Population-based estimate of prostate cancer risk for carriers of the HOXB13 missense mutation G84E. PLoS ONE. 2013; 8(2):e54727. PMID: 23457453
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  16. National Comprehensive Cancer Network®, Clinical practice guidelines in oncology. Genetic/Familial High Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian. http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/f_guidelines.asp Accessed January 2018.
  17. National Library of Medicine Genetics Home Reference. Prostate cancer. http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/prostate-cancer. Accessed January 2018.
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  21. Olsen, JH, et al. Breast and other cancers in 1445 blood relatives of 75 Nordic patients with ataxia telangiectasia. Br. J. Cancer. 2005; 93(2):260-5. PMID: 15942625
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  26. Pritchard, CC. et al. Inherited DNA-Repair Gene Mutations in Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer. NEJM, 2016 PMID: 27433846
  27. Cheng, HH, et al. A Pilot Study of Clinical Targeted Next Generation Sequencing for Prostate Cancer: Consequences for Treatment and Genetic Counseling. Prostate. 2016; 76(14):1303-1311. PMID: 27324988
  28. Moran, A, et al. Risk of cancer other than breast or ovarian in individuals with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Fam. Cancer. 2012; 11(2):235-42. PMID: 22187320
  29. Cai, Q, et al. Germline HOXB13 p.Gly84Glu mutation and cancer susceptibility: a pooled analysis of 25 epidemiological studies with 145,257 participates. Oncotarget. 2015; 6(39):42312-21. PMID: 26517352
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  32. Xu, J, et al. HOXB13 is a susceptibility gene for prostate cancer: results from the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics (ICPCG). Hum. Genet. 2013; 132(1):5-14. PMID: 23064873
  33. Ewing, CM, et al. Germline mutations in HOXB13 and prostate-cancer risk. N. Engl. J. Med. 2012; 366(2):141-9. PMID: 22236224
  34. Huang, H, Cai, B. G84E mutation in HOXB13 is firmly associated with prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis. Tumour Biol. 2014; 35(2):1177-82. PMID: 24026887
  35. Steffen, J, et al. Increased cancer risk of heterozygotes with NBS1 germline mutations in Poland. Int. J. Cancer. 2004; 111(1):67-71. doi: 10.1002/ijc.20239. PMID: 15185344
  36. di, Masi, A, Antoccia, A. NBS1 Heterozygosity and Cancer Risk. Curr. Genomics. 2008; 9(4):275-81. doi: 10.2174/138920208784533610. PMID: 19452044
  37. Pakkanen, S, et al. PALB2 variants in hereditary and unselected Finnish prostate cancer cases. J Negat Results Biomed. 2009; 8:12. PMID: 20003494
  38. Tischkowitz, M, et al. Analysis of the gene coding for the BRCA2-interacting protein PALB2 in hereditary prostate cancer. Prostate. 2008; 68(6):675-8. PMID: 18288683
  39. Erkko, H, et al. A recurrent mutation in PALB2 in Finnish cancer families. Nature. 2007; 446(7133):316-9. PMID: 17287723
  40. Pelttari, LM, et al. A Finnish founder mutation in RAD51D: analysis in breast, ovarian, prostate, and colorectal cancer. J. Med. Genet. 2012; 49(7):429-32. PMID: 22652533
  41. Wilkes, DC, et al. A germline FANCA alteration that is associated with increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cold Spring Harb Mol Case Stud. 2017; 3(5):None. PMID: 28864460
  42. Hayano, T, et al. Germline Variants of Prostate Cancer in Japanese Families. PLoS ONE. 2016; 11(10):e0164233. PMID: 27701467
  43. Beltran, H, et al. Whole-Exome Sequencing of Metastatic Cancer and Biomarkers of Treatment Response. JAMA Oncol. 2015; 1(4):466-74. PMID: 26181256
  44. Giri, VN, et al. Inherited Mutations in Men Undergoing Multigene Panel Testing for Prostate Cancer: Emerging Implications for Personalized Prostate Cancer Genetic Evaluation. JCO Precision Oncology, 2017
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This test is provided by:

Invitae

Frequently asked questions

Do I need a doctor to authorise this test?
Yes, your doctor will need to provide the sample required for this test.
Will my health insurance cover the cost of this test?
Many health insurance plans cover the cost of genetic testing – check with your provider to find out if it is in your policy.
How accurate is the test?
All our partners follow advanced laboratory procedures and ensure quality control to deliver accurate results you can trust.